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A post-operative device that monitors a patient’s rehabilitation progress is now set for clinical trial, thanks to funding from the South Australian Government and Flinders University’s Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP).

Maxm Skate, is a simple yet highly sophisticated device supplemented with an e- health software solution which empowers patients suffering lower leg knee injuries or undergoing lower limb surgery including total, partial or revision knee replacement surgery to undertake rehabilitation exercises to strengthen their lower limb muscles and enables them to monitor their own rehabilitation program.

Flinders University is pleased to be a consortium partner of the inaugural BridgeTech Program.

In an event held by the Medical Device Partnering Program on 30th April at the Tonsley Innovation Precinct, Professor Lyn Griffiths of Queensland University of Technology formally opened the program for applications.

This year QUT, in collaboration with MTPConnect and 15 university and industry partners and organisations in the medical-biotechnology sector, will deliver an exciting, new and innovative education program that will provide the necessary training to enable the successful commercialisation of Australian medical technology research.

Flinders University’s Medical Device Partnering Program celebrated a significant milestone at the Tonsley Innovation Precinct on 30th April, kick-starting their 10th birthday celebrations.

Since humble beginnings in 2008, the MDPP has challenged the traditional paradigms of invention and IP creation to develop a model which facilitates collaboration between researchers, industry and clinicians. 

During the past 10 years MDPP has fielded over 350 project enquiries, held over 130 industry workshops and completed 80 projects.

Commonwealth Games iStock web

South Australian start-up Prohab will launch its new rehabilitation device at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games this month.

The Prohab rehab device connects to standard resistance bands or cables, widely used in physiotherapy, to precisely measure the force applied to the band.

The data is then captured and sent to an app where it can be visualised instantaneously as well as tracked over time.

An Adelaide invention that communicates rehabilitation improvements in real time, helping patients stay on track with treatment, is ready for trial and primed for export.

The device is one of the latest projects to receive support from the State Government’s Medical Technologies Program, delivered through Flinders University’s innovative Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP).

MDPP Director, Professor Karen Reynolds named Honorary Fellow of Engineers Australia in recognition of her innovative work in biomedical engineering and her significant contributions to the Australian medical device industry.

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